Last updated on: 7/5/2018 2:06:18 PM PST
How Big Is the Milk Industry?


General Reference (not clearly pro or con)
Progressive Dairyman magazine, in a May 24, 2018 article titled "2017 Milk Value Fell Short of Expectations," available from progressivedairy.com, wrote:

"In 2017, U.S. dairy farmers employed the most cows in about two decades... Total U.S. milk production increased to 215.5 billion pounds, 1.4 percent more than 2016...

Dairy's economic impact adds billions of dollars to U.S., regional, state and local economies each year. Total 2017 U.S. milk production was valued at $38.1 billion, up from $34.5 billion in 2016.

Marketings (milk sold to plants and directly to consumers) totaled 214.5 billion pounds, about 1.5 percent above 2016... [C]ash receipts from 2017 milk marketings totaled $37.9 billion, 9.8 percent higher than 2016...

Among individual agricultural commodities, cash receipts from milk sales ranked fourth in 2017, behind only cattle ($66.5 billion), corn ($46.4 billion) and soybeans ($38.7 billion), according to data from the USDA...

Eleven states again topped the $1 billion mark for annual milk receipts in 2017... California and Wisconsin accounted for $12 billion in 2017 cash receipts, or about 32 percent of the U.S. total."

 


May 24, 2018 - Progressive Dairyman 

The American Farm Bureau Federation, in a Dec. 19, 2017 article titled "Trends in Beverage Milk Consumption," available from fb.org, wrote:

"[F]rom 2012 to 2016, annual conventional milk sales declined by more than 4 billion pounds, or approximately 8 percent... Organic sales captured some of this market, increasing by 20 percent, or 425 million pounds...

The decline in conventional milk consumption was the largest in reduced-fat non-flavored milk such as 2 percent, 1 percent and skim. From 2012 to 2016, skim milk sales have declined 2.6 billion pounds, or 36 percent; 2 percent milk sales declined by 2.3 billion pounds, or 13 percent; and 1 percent milk sales declined by 411 million pounds, or 6 percent...

Milk-Consumption-US

Coinciding with shifting consumer preferences to full-fat dairy products, sales of full-fat flavored and whole milk are up 1.1 billion pounds from 2012 to 2016. Whole milk sales are up nearly 1 billion pounds per year, or approximately 7 percent, and flavored whole milk sales are up 93 million pounds, or 18 percent...

Year-to-date sales of whole milk are up 2.4 percent, flavored whole milk sales are up 9.2 percent, and reduced fat flavored milk sales are up 1.6 percent. Organic sales have remained mostly flat in 2017. Meanwhile, sales of reduced-fat non-flavored milk are all down over prior year levels."

Dec. 19, 2017 - American Farm Bureau Federation